Preview... Preview...New Translation New TranslationClose DocumentEditCopy URL Copy URLdesign elements\dark grey - all design elements\dark grey - alldesign elements\lightblue - insulationdesign elements\dark red - technical foamdesign elements\bright red - armasportdesign elements\border light bluedesign elements\border light blue blue-backgrounddesign elements\subheadline - borderdesign elements\headline - borderdesign elements\border dark reddesign elements\border dark red blue-backgrounddesign elements\subheadline - borderdesign elements\headline - borderdesign elements\border bright reddesign elements\border red blue-backgrounddesign elements\subheadline - borderdesign elements\headline - borderdesign elements\border greydesign elements\border grey blue-backgrounddesign elements\subheadline greydesign elements\headline greydesign elements\border greendesign elements\border green blue-backgrounddesign elements\subheadline - borderdesign elements\headline - borderINSERT\copy iframe INSERT\copy iframeINSERT\copy from templatefor use in iframe: copy URL for use in iframe: copy URL

Acoustic 09 - Library - How is noise perceived (alias)
Internet FAQ

Show details for CategoriesCategories
Hide details for ContentContent

How is noise perceived?
Sub-Headline


Sound is caused by small variations in pressure that travel through the air and are picked up by our eardrum.
Because our ears have the ability to detect very loud and very quiet sounds, we measure the sound level on something called the ‘decibel scale’. The decibel scale enables us to better interpret between the overall levels of different sounds.

As an example, the pressure released from a pin dropping is very small, i.e. 0.00002Pa and is close to our threshold of hearing. The pressure released from a pneumatic drill is much higher, i.e. 20Pa. In other words, a pneumatic drill is around 10,000 times louder than a drop of a pin. However, because of the way our ears work, it is quite difficult for us to comprehend the actual pressure difference. The decibel scale, which is essentially the sound pressure plotted on a logarithmic scale, provides a much better representation of the difference in levels between the two sounds. On the decibel scale, shown below, we can see that that pin dropping has a level of 0 dB (decibel) and the pneumatic drill has a level of 120 dB.

Please click on small sound icon to hear an example of the described noise level


Bodytext1 ! please check, if this field is supported by the choosen layout !


How is noise perceived?

Internal documents (for information purposes, not incuded to FAQ-documents)


Created Translations: